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Division of Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Contact Information

Office Location: G-142
Phone: 318-678-6468

Mission of the Division of Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

The mission of the Division of Technology, Engineering and Mathematics is to provide quality educational opportunities in four discipline areas. In the area of technology, students will learn innovative techniques and upcoming trends in computer systems, programming, networking and security. The discipline of engineering will provide students with a foundation to design and build solutions for the problems of tomorrow. In the concentration for mathematics, students will increase their quantitative understanding of concepts relevant to their area of study. Energy, construction, and industrial technologies relate theoretical concepts to the actual production of goods and services using technologically advanced equipment and processes. All discipline areas strive to align curriculum with national certifications and prepare students for joining tomorrow's workforce.

Associate Degree, Certificate, and Technical Competency Area Information

The Division of Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics offers the following associate degree, certificate of technical studies, and technical competency area programs:

Associate of Applied Science:

Associate of Science:

Certificate of Technical Studies:

Technical Competency Area:

  • The Technical Competency Area in Advanced Manufacturing and Mechatronics provides an introduction to the automation, manufacturing and process technology. Students completing the Advanced Manufacturing and Mechatronics TCA will obtain technical skills necessary for qualified entrance for introductory careers and the Louisiana States Certification for Manufacturing (C4M).
  • The Technical Competency Area in CISCO provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to pass both the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) and the Cisco Certified Network Administrator (CCNA) certifications. These certifications show competence in students to manage and maintain medium and enterprise-level network infrastructure and to properly secure them. This is a vendor-specific TCA aimed at Cisco routers and switches.
  • The Technical Competency Area in Information Technology program will produce skilled employees for the manufacturing industries. Skills taught have been derived from typical business requirements for existing manufacturing employees and those entering the workforce.
  • The Technical Competency Area in Microsoft Server provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to pass the Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) certification. This certification is a prerequisite for upper level Microsoft Certifications and show competency in managing a small to medium Microsoft Server network. This is a vendor-specific TCA aimed at management of Microsoft Servers.
  • Technical Competency Area in Software Applications - A job-skills-specific program in the area of commonly used business software applications for students who do not need or wish to complete a two-year curriculum, but who are required to demonstrate proof of knowledge and skills necessary to meet the basic computer needs of the business community.
  • Technical Competency Area in Web Design - A well-rounded selection of courses balanced between general orientation to business/industry and applied technical skills. Students completing the Web Design TCA will obtain technical skills necessary for qualified entrance into Web Design and maintenance-related careers.

Accredited Programs

The Bossier Parish Community College Associate of Applied Science in Computer Information Systems, Associate of Applied Science in Information Network Security Specialist, Associate of Applied Science in Information Network Specialist, Associate of Applied Science in Information Programmer Analyst, and Associate of Applied Science in Web Analyst Programmer programs have applied for accreditation by the Associate of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE), located at 1390 Eisenhower Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48108 (http://atmae.org).Will open new browser window or tabATMAE's vision is to set standards for academic program accreditation, personal certification, and professional development for educators and industry professionals involved in integrating technology, leadership and design. Students applying for graduation in one of these programs will be required to complete twelve hours in technical course work at Bossier Parish Community College.

Mathematics

Bossier Parish Community College offers developmental math courses, as well as, math courses that will transfer to other institutions of higher learning. MATH 097, MATH 098, and MATH 099 will prepare students to succeed in MATH 102, College Algebra. MATH 102 is part of the core curriculum of the associate degree. Also, BPCC offers a mathematics elective for the associate degree and for students wishing to receive a baccalaureate degree from another institution. Students must check with their academic advisor to determine which mathematics electives will transfer to the baccalaureate degree institution.

The mathematics elective can be chosen from the following mathematics courses:

  • MATH 111: Precalculus
  • MATH 112: Trigonometry
  • MATH 114: Finite Math
  • MATH 124: Mathematical Concepts
  • MATH 131: Elementary Applied Calculus
  • MATH 210: Basic Statistics
  • MATH 250: Calculus I
  • MATH 251: Calculus II
  • MATH 252: Calculus III
  • MATH 253: Calculus IV
  • MATH 254: Differential Equations

Students must take the Math Placement test if the ACT score in math falls below 20 or if there are no ACT scores. Students will be placed in the mathematics course indicated by the Compass Placement test score.

For Elementary Education Majors:

BPCC offers the following three courses in mathematics for elementary school teachers:

  • MATH 117: Elementary Number Structure
  • MATH 217: Elementary Geometry
  • MATH 218: Elementary Statistics

Computer-based Developmental Mathematics:

Computer-based developmental mathematics is a class for MATH 097, MATH 098, or MATH 099 students. This class meets in a classroom equipped with computers. The instructor facilitates on an individual and small group basis, meeting the changing needs of the students. Students work with interactive software in this setting, completing homework and assessments on the computer. Because students work at their own pace, full-time students may complete more than one level of developmental mathematics in one semester. Students need some basic computer knowledge for these math courses. The instructor requests that you wait until after the first class meeting to purchase your textbook.

All students must be enrolled full-time as of the 14th class day in order to complete more than one level of developmental mathematics in one semester. (Financial Aid students must be enrolled full-time as of the 14th class day AND the date aid is disbursed in order to complete more than one level of developmental mathematics in one semester.)

Choose computer-based developmental mathematics if you:

  • are self-motivated and work well on your own,
  • want to complete more than one level of developmental mathematics in one semester and are a full-time student,
  • prefer to review a textbook on your own rather than having the material presented by an instructor,
  • need frequent self-checks for learning the material,
  • need only to review prerequisites necessary for college algebra,
  • have some basic computer knowledge and prefer to work on the computer.

Computer-based College Algebra (MATH 102):

Computer-based college algebra is a class for MATH 102 students. This class meets in a classroom equipped with computers. The instructor facilitates on an individual and small group basis, meeting the changing needs of the students. Students work with interactive software in this setting, completing homework and assessments on the computer. Students need some basic computer knowledge for this math course. The instructor requests that you wait until after the first class meeting to purchase your textbook.

Choose computer-based college algebra if you:

  • are self-motivated and work well on your own,
  • prefer to review a textbook on your own rather than having the material presented by an instructor,
  • need frequent self-checks for learning the material,
  • have some basic computer knowledge and prefer to work on the computer.

QEP Mathematics Courses

BPCC’s Quality Enhancement Plan is “Enhancing Student Learning and Engagement in High Risk Mathematics.” BPCC’s goal for the QEP is to improve student learning and engagement in developmental mathematics courses. The Quality Enhancement Plan for teaching developmental mathematics consists of three unique teaching models. They are as follows:

Developmental Mathematics with Supplemental Computer Lab

This model consists of teacher-directed instruction combined with a one hour supplemental lab experience using MyMathLab. Two sections of MATH 097, MATH 098, and MATH 099 are offered consisting of three hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Instructors will direct the lab experience.

Choose developmental mathematics with supplemental computer lab if you:

  • prefer traditional lecture method
  • need an instructor to assist you with your computer assignments
  • are able to attend class four hours per week.

Lecture-style MATH 097 and MATH 098 in one semester:

This model consists of a 16-week term that meets six hours per week. During the first eight weeks, students will master MATH 097 objectives through traditional lecture-style teaching using MyMathLab for supplemental instruction. The Learning Center will offer tutoring services for students needing additional instruction. Students will take a final exam. Students passing MATH 097 may continue the last eight weeks of the term in MATH 098 following the same teaching plan.

This model allows student to take one developmental course over an 8-week period. It also gives them the opportunity to complete two developmental courses in one semester.

All students must be enrolled full-time as of the 14th class day in order to complete more than one level of developmental mathematics in one semester. (Financial Aid students must be enrolled full-time as of the 14th class day AND the date aid is disbursed in order to complete more than one level of developmental mathematics in one semester.)

LAMP: Learning-Outcomes Achieved at Mastery Proficiency

A major problem facing developmental mathematics instruction that inflicts and alarming failure rate is that mathematics concepts build upon one another. When students fail to understand concepts in the first chapter, they are still required to move on to the next chapter. Mastery learning is desirous in developmental math courses. Students are required to demonstrate competency in specified cognitive skills, which can be used to document learning. The outlines of the characteristics of instruction in mastery learning programs:

  • Instruction expectations about the course outcomes are clearly defined and communicated to students
  • The course is divided into sequential organized units in which prerequisites are addressed before more complicated material is covered
  • The instructor regularly evaluates student progress against stated learning concepts and provides further, corrective instruction as needed to bring students to mastery.

Community college students typically arrive in developmental math class with an extremely broad range of math skill levels leaving some students at the high end of skill level to fail or do poorly because of boredom and others at the low end to fail because they cannot keep up. The ideal solution would be to instruct each student individually. With emerging and advancing hardware and instructional software technology present, there is a strong potential for effectively providing individualized instruction. Current developments in computer-mediated instruction are geared to mastery learning.

The math management program generates personalized math assignments at each student’s level and scores assignments. It provides reports and record keeping functions to monitor student progress and to address individual needs.

The software monitors progress of mathematical skills practice. It generates individualized assignments and tests, corrects assignments and tests, and reads and reports results for immediate feedback. Each individualized assignment is based on data from previous assignments. Students may test on course concepts when they have correctly answered a set of questions about those concepts at a success rate of 80% or higher.

Students are responsible for completing assignments and tests, reviewing incorrect answers, setting appropriate goals based on their abilities (with teacher assistance) and discussing their progress with the teacher. The teacher is responsible for planning (individual, small, or whole group), motivating students by setting individual goals and feedback, intervening when students need additional assistance, monitoring progress through reports, and discussing assignments and tests with students.

Students will begin with MATH 097 concepts that need to be mastered, and may continue on with the next developmental course, MATH 098. If the student does not complete the second course, data on concepts mastered will be kept on file. Upon registering for MATH 098 the next semester, students will have to prove mastery again on concepts completed at 80% or higher before continuing with the remaining concepts for course completion.

Students will not be doing their assignments on computers. The computer is used only to run software which generated students’ paper assignments, tests, and progress reports.

Administration and Staff

Sandra Partain
Dean

Megan Martin
Assistant Dean

Brian Bryant
Grant Director, TAACCCT/AMMQC

Denise Chambers
Participant Performance Monitor

Twana Harris
Program Coordinator

Jennifer Lawrence
Grant Assistant Director TAACCT3

Niesha McCoy
Workforce Board Recruiter

Jennifer Parish
Program Coordinator

Christina Poole
Consortium Grants Accountant

Kristen Roohani
Student Services Specialist, Technology

Amy Russell
Administrative Coordinator III

Jeanne Price Smith
Administrative Coordinator III

Paul Spivey
Project Advisor/Knowledge Content Lead

Tim Stevenson
Program Coordinator for C4

Faculty

Professors:

Achla Agarwal
Donna Densmore
Chris Rondeau (Program Director, Security)
Dr. Paul Weaver

Associate Professors:

Stacey Black
Edward Chopin (Program Director, Industrial Technology)
Ginger Eaves
Deanna Hardy
Pamela Milstead
Allan Pratt (Program Director, Industrial Control Systems)
Annette Shows
Pam Stogsdill
Frank Viviano

Assistant Professors:

Jason Cooper (Content Knowledge Lead/Project Advisor)
Dalia Gumeel (Program Director, Programming)
Dr. Miles Hitchcock
Thomas Hopkins
Dr. Jack Raley (Program Direcgtor, Computer Information Systems)
Chris Shaw

Instructors:

Michelle Villemarette Barnickel
Rocky Duplichan
Lamont Lackman
Skylar Robey
Carrie Salinas
Dr. June Schneider (Program Director, Engineering)
Lindsay Small
Linda Sonnier (Program Director, Construction and Energy)
Dr. Ed Thomas

Interim Instructors:

Jennifer Igo
Beth Voss