Concentrations: Medical Coding or Medical Transcription

Objective:

To provide the health care community with quality medical coders or medical transcriptionists who are prepared for employment in hospitals, clinics, HMOs, private practices, insurance billing companies, transcription companies, or other medically related facilities.

Career Description:

Medical coders and billing specialists have a vital role in the health care industry. Medical diagnoses and procedures must be assigned code numbers to ensure proper payment to the medical provider. Medical coders use a skill called abstracting to identify which medical conditions and procedures should have codes assigned for a visit. The coding specialist must also recognize inconsistencies/deficiencies in the medical documentation needed to support code assignment. Medical coding and billing specialists work together to make sure the health care provider gets paid correctly. They enter data into medical billing software programs regarding the services performed. They may prepare statements, run electronic reports to document account status, and work with patients and insurance companies to ensure timely payment. Skills required for this profession include thorough understanding of medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, ICD and CPT coding languages, and strong communication skills. Persons interested in this field should be well organized, pay careful attention to detail and use critical thinking skills. The Medical Office Specialist training at Bossier Parish Community College will help students prepare for entry-level positions in physician offices, clinics, hospitals, long-term care facilities, insurance companies and other medical facilities. After graduation, student may sit for the Certified Professional Coder (CPC) exam through the American Academy of Professional CodersWill open new browser window or tab or the Certified Coding Specialist (CCS) exam through the American Health Information Management Association.Will open new browser window or tab

Medical transcriptionists listen to dictated recordings made by physicians and other health care professionals and transcribe them into medical reports, correspondence, and other administrative documents. Transcriptionists generally listen to the recordings on a headset. They use a foot pedal to pause the recording when necessary and type the text into a computer. They also perform text editing for grammar and clarity. They type a variety of medical documents including discharge summaries, medical history and physical examination reports, operative reports, consultation reports, autopsy reports, diagnostic imaging studies, progress notes, and referral letters. Medical transcriptionists return transcribed documents to the physicians or other healthcare professionals who dictated them for review and signature or correction. These documents become part of patients' permanent medical files. Skills required for this profession include thorough understanding of medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, word processing, grammar, punctuation and strong communication skills. Persons interested in this field should be well organized, pay careful attention to detail and use critical thinking skills. The Medical Office Specialist training at Bossier Parish Community College will help students prepare for entry-level positions in physician offices, clinics, hospitals, long-term care facilities, insurance companies and other medical facilities. Experienced transcriptionists spot mistakes or inconsistencies in a medical report and check to correct the information. Their ability to understand and correctly transcribe patient assessments and treatments reduces the chance of patients receiving ineffective or even harmful treatments and ensures high-quality patient care. After graduation, student may sit for the Certified Medical Transcriptionist (CMT) exam offered through the Association for Healthcare Documentation Integrity, formerly the American Association for Medical Transcription.Will open new browser window or tab

Medical office specialists must comply with specific standards that apply to the healthcare industry and to the legal and ethical requirements for keeping patient information confidential.

Learn more about transcriptionWill open new browser window or tab and codingWill open new browser window or tab on the U. S. Department of Labor Statistics website.

Program Overview:

BPCC's Medical Office Specialist (MOS) Program consists of a pre-clinical component and a clinical component. Students may work at any pace (part-time/full-time) to complete the pre-clinical courses and other requirements. Once all qualification courses are completed with a grade of "C" or better, students may apply for admission to the clinical component of the program. Applications are available online and are accepted each fall semester. After approval to enter the clinical component of the program, students attend a mandatory orientation meeting to receive information outlining requirements for participation in this section of the program.

Technical Diploma students must test out of READ 099, into ENGL 101, and into MATH 099 as documented by ACT, placement test, or course completion.

Coding concentration students must take ALHT 114 and MOS 110 during the same fall semester.

Students are encouraged to see the program advisor before scheduling classes.

Admission to the MOS Program

Students should be aware of the following requirements and procedures regarding clinical selection:

  • Students must submit a completed MOS Clinical Application by the deadline of September 15th.
  • Pre-clinical courses must be completed with a GPA of 2.50 or higher and students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all required classes to be eligible for application.
  • Selected students must attend a mandatory orientation meeting to receive information regarding the requirements of clinical participation.
  • Students selected for the MOS program must maintain a minimum grade of "C" or better in all clinical course work (MOS 110, MOS 111, MOS 113, MOS 216, MOS 216L, MOS 114, MOS 116) in order to remain in the program.
  • Any student who fails to maintain a "C" or better in clinical course work will be terminated from the program. The student must then reapply for the next class the following year if he/she wishes to pursue the Medical Office Specialist technical diploma.
  • Students must meet the minimum clinical essential requirements.PDF File
  • Students must have a physical exam formPDF File completed by a physician.
  • Students must have documentationPDF File of required immunizations, titers and blood tests required for entrance into allied health clinicals.
  • Students must have proof of active medical insurance coverage.
  • Students must submit to random drug testing and criminal background checks.
  • Students are encouraged to see the program advisor before scheduling classes.
  • Students must adhere to the MOS program requirements detailed in the MOS Program Handbook.

Estimate of Cost

The pre-clinical component of the program has only the costs associated with regular tuition per credit hour, fees and books which are the same as all BPCC students. Once accepted into the clinical component of the program, there are additional costs including clinical fees, medical examination, immunizations, titers and drug screening, etc.

Special Requirements

During clinical rotations, students must acquire a minimum of 100 supervised on-the-job hours performing assigned duties in local healthcare facilities. These hours are part of the students’ education and there is no financial compensation. Students must be available for clinical rotation assignments Monday – Friday for up to 8 hours per day between 8:00 am and 5:00 pm.

Gainful Employment

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)